Women Make Movies Women Make Movies View Cart
Women Make Movies
Find


Race and Racism
 
This powerful and urgent collection of films about race and racism spans topics such as police profiling, HIV/AIDS and public health, political activism, and the effects of segregation. As our country witnesses clashes over the Black Lives Matter movement and white identity politics in the aftermath of Charlottesville, as the rate of hate crimes continues to rise, and as racist discourse creeps back into politics, this collection is essential viewing for all classrooms and areas of study.


films in this collection

DVD Sale $350.00

Download Photo


Black Girl in Suburbia
A film by Melissa Lowery



For many Black girls raised in the suburbs, the experiences of going to school, playing on the playground, and living day-to-day life can be uniquely alienating. BLACK GIRL IN SUBURBIA looks at the suburbs of America from the perspective of women of color. Filmmaker Melissa Lowery shares her own childhood memories of navigating racial expectations both subtle and overt-including questions like, "Hey, I just saw a Black guy walking down the street; is that your cousin?" More


DVD Sale $350.00

Download Photo


LaDonna Harris: Indian 101
A film by Julianna Brannum

LADONNA HARRIS: INDIAN 101 from Comanche filmmaker Julianna Brannum, chronicles the life of Comanche activist and national civil rights leader LaDonna Harris and the role that she has played in Native and mainstream America history since the 1960s. In this new verite style documentary, Brannum, the great niece of Harris, celebrates her life and the personal struggles that led her to become a voice for Native people and her contemporary work to strengthen and rebuild indigenous communities and train emerging Native leaders around the world. More

Best Documentary and Best Biographical Film, Native American Indian Film and Video Festival

DVD Sale $395.00

Download Photo


Living Thinkers: An Autobiography of Black Women in the Ivory Tower
A film by Roxana Walker-Canton

LIVING THINKERS: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF BLACK WOMEN IN THE IVORY TOWER examines the intersection of race, class and gender for Black women professors and administrators working in U.S. colleges and universities today. Through their diverse narratives, from girlhood to the present, Black women from different disciplines share experiences that have shaped them, including segregated schooling as children, and the trials, disappointments and triumphs encountered in Academia. Though more than 100 years have passed since the doors to higher education opened for Black women, their numbers as faculty members are woefully low and for many still, the image of Black women as intellectuals is incomprehensible. More

BlackStar Film Festival, Audience Choice Award for Documentary

DVD Sale $395.00

Download Photo


Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End AIDS
A film by Harriet Hirshorn



NOTHING WITHOUT US tells the inspiring story of the vital role that women have played - and continue to play - in the global fight against HIV/AIDS. Combining archival footage and interviews with female activists, scientists and scholars in the US and Africa, Nothing Without Us reveals how women not only shaped grassroots groups like ACT-UP in the U.S., but have also played an essential part in HIV prevention and treatment access throughout sub-Saharan Africa. From beauty parlors in Baton Rouge to the first HIV clinic in Burundi, this film looks boldly at the unaddressed dynamics that keep women around the world at high-risk for HIV, while introducing the remarkable women who have the answers to ending this 30-year old pandemic. More


DVD Sale $350.00

Download Photo


Old South
A film by Danielle Beverly

OLD SOUTH, through a quiet unfolding story, provides a window into the underlying dynamics of race relations that influence so many American communities. In Athens, Georgia, a college fraternity traditionally known to fly the Confederate flag moves to a historically black neighborhood and establishes their presence by staging an antebellum style parade. What starts with a neighborhood struggle over cultural legacies in the South, the opening of a community garden becomes a grounds for understanding, as well as a physical and emotional space for healing, offering a sense of possibility and hope for the future. More

Award of Merit, Documentary, University Film & Video Association (UFVA)

DVD Sale $395.00

Download Photo
Download Press Kit

Ovarian Psycos
A film by Joanna Sokolowski and Kate Trumbull-LaValle

Riding at night through streets deemed dangerous in Eastside Los Angeles, the Ovarian Psycos use their bicycles to confront the violence in their lives. At the helm of the crew is founder Xela de la X, a single mother and poet M.C. dedicated to recruiting an unapologetic, misfit crew of women of color. The film intimately chronicles Xela as she struggles to strike a balance between her activism and nine year old daughter Yoli; street artist Andi who is estranged from her family and journeys to become a leader within the crew; and bright eyed recruit Evie, who despite poverty, and the concerns of her protective Salvadoran mother, discovers a newfound confidence. More

Audience Award, Portland Film Festival
People’s Choice Award, Rueda Film Festival

DVD Sale $350.00

Download Photo


PROFILED
A film by Kathleen Foster

Profiled knits the stories of mothers of Black and Latino youth murdered by the NYPD into a powerful indictment of racial profiling and police brutality, and places them within a historical context of the roots of racism in the U.S. Some of the victims—Eric Garner, Michael Brown—are now familiar the world over. Others, like Shantel Davis and Kimani Gray, are remembered mostly by family and friends in their New York neighborhoods. More

Paul Robeson Award Honorary Mention, The Newark Black Film Festival

DVD Sale $395.00



Slaying the Dragon and Slaying the Dragon: Reloaded
SLAYING THE DRAGON (1988) by Deborah Gee, SLAYING THE DRAGON: RELOADED (2011) by Elaine H. Kim



SLAYING THE DRAGON is a comprehensive look at media stereotypes of Asian and Asian American women since the silent era. From the racist use of white actors to portray Asians in early Hollywood films, through the success of Anna May Wong’s sinister dragon lady, to Suzie Wong and the ’50s geisha girls, to the Asian-American anchorwoman of today, this fascinating film shows how stereotypes of exoticism and docility have affected the perception of Asian-American women. Produced by Asian Women United, this invaluable resource has been widely used by universities and libraries. More

Asian Pacific Arts Association, Jimmie Award
American Film and Video Festival, Finalist

DVD Sale $395.00

Download Photo


Southern Rites
A film by Gillian Laub

Broadcast nationally on HBO, SOUTHERN RITES is a powerful portrayal of how perceptions and politics have divided two towns in southeast Georgia along racial lines for years. In 2009, The New York Times Magazine published filmmaker and acclaimed photographer Gillian Laub’s controversial images of Montgomery County High School’s racially segregated proms. A media furor ensued and under extreme pressure, the Georgian town was forced to finally integrate the proms in 2010. Laub returned camera in hand to document the changes, only to stumble upon a series of events far more indicative of race relations in the Deep South: old wounds are reopened following the murder of an unarmed young black man by an elderly white town patriarch. Against the backdrop of an historic campaign to elect its first African-American sheriff, the case divides locals along well-worn racial lines and threatens to drag the town back to darker days. More


DVD Sale $350.00

Download Photo


Too Black to be French
A film by Isabelle Boni-Claverie

In this documentary film, Isabelle Boni-Claverie explores the role of race and the persistence of racism in France, as well as the impact of the French colonial past. Through an exploration of her personal family history, and interviews with historians and academics, TOO BLACK TO BE FRENCH peels back the layers of race relations in supposedly institutionally colorblind France. More


DVD Sale $350.00

Download Photo


Wilhemina's War
A film by June Cross

In much of America, progress in HIV/AIDS treatment suggests the worst is behind us, but every year 50,000 Americans are still diagnosed with the virus that causes AIDS. Astonishingly, it’s one of the leading causes of death of African American women. And nearly half of the Americans with HIV live in the South, where the AIDS epidemic has taken root in rural communities. WILHEMINA’S WAR is an intimate, personal narrative that tells the story of one family’s struggle with HIV over the course of five years. Despite facing institutional and personal obstacles every step of the way, 62-year-old Wilhemina Dixon works tirelessly to combat the stigma and care for her daughter and granddaughter, both HIV-positive. More

Best Documentary, Reel Sisters Film Festival



back to top

go to year view by subject view by title view by maker

  amazon amazon
 

 

Violence Against Women: Ending the Silence


Highlighting the extraordinary strength of women who survive sexual assault, institutional disregard, domestic violence and more, these films break the historical silence that has often surrounded issues of violence against women. See the full collection here.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN: Celebrate the Lives of African-American Women

Shooting Women

Including the essential civil rights films CHISOLM '72 - UNBOUGHT AND UNBOSSED and STANDING ON MY SISTERS' SHOULDERS, the acclaimed documentary LOVE & DIANE and biographies on the inimitable Audre Lorde and Beah Richards, the African American Collection celebrates the lives of African American women and the contributions they have made to their families, their communities and society. 


© Women Make Movies
site map

Women Make Movies is a multicultural, multiracial, non-profit media arts organization which facilitates the production, promotion, distribution, and exhibition of independent films and videotapes by and about women. contact us